Coronavirus: Think twice before leaving Nigeria – US warns his Citizens

The United States Mission in Nigeria has warned its nationals willing to leave the country amid the rising cases of COVID-19, to brace up for the impending challenges they are bound to encounter at home.

The US Mission in a statement issued on its website yesterday, informed potential evacuees that healthcare systems in many localities in the United States were currently overwhelmed.

It stressed that any of the returnees requiring medical care in the USA would be responsible for all costs, while adding that there were shortages of many basic supplies across the country, including toilet paper, canned and frozen foods.

It further warned that citizens evacuated from Nigeria may be unable to return until the Nigerian government reopens the airports and commercial flights resume.

“Two flights that were scheduled to depart Lagos on Friday were cancelled due to flight clearance issues in other West African states. The U.S. government immediately took action to redress the situation and the flights have been rescheduled.

“Potential evacuees (should) bear in mind the following considerations in determining if an evacuation flight is in the best interest of you and your family:

“Healthcare systems in many localities in the United States are currently overwhelmed. If you need to seek medical care while in the United States, you will be responsible for all costs not covered by your insurance;

“There are shortages of many basic supplies across the United States, including toilet paper and canned and frozen foods. Many stores, restaurants, and businesses are closed”, the statement read.

It added, “At this time, Nigerian airports are closed to all commercial international flights. If you evacuate to the United States, it is unlikely you will be able to return to Nigeria until the Nigerian government reopens the airports and commercial flights resume.”

The United States has so far recorded over 300,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19, with a total of 9,649 deaths.